THE MONTESSORI
CLASSROOM

CHILD-CENTERED LEARNING

A Montessori classroom is very different from a traditional classroom:

Children develop at different rates. For that reason Montessori education “follows the child”. Children are given lessons with self-contained, self-correcting materials that teach the next concept on any path of understanding. From that point the child is free to take that lesson off the shelf as their work. Once that concept has been internalized, the directress will present the next lesson on that path to the child. In this way each child develops as quickly as they can without being pressured to “keep up with the group” or being made to “slow down to wait for the group”.

Prepared Environment

A Montessori classroom is a thing of beauty! The lessons on the shelves are beautifully made and displayed in an orderly way to entice young hands to touch. Clutter and chaos have no place in a Montessori classroom. Everything in a Montessori classroom has a purpose and a role in the development of the child.

Classroom
These words reveal the child’s inner most needs: “Help me do it alone.”
Maria Montessori
Student

FREEDOM within LIMITS

The expectation of behavior within a Montessori classroom is very high. There are carefully constructed rules that create the calm, focused atmosphere within the classroom. Within these well defined limits the children are allowed the freedom to choose their own work from the shelves, from the lessons that they have been given. This combination of freedom within limits allows the children to discover self-discipline, while creating independent learners.

Teacher

ROLE OF TEACHER

The role of a Montessori teacher is very different from the role of a teacher in a traditional classroom. Unlike traditional classrooms the teacher isn’t the focal point of the room, imparting knowledge to the entire classroom at once. The teacher can usually be seen working quietly with one or a small group of children, giving them a lesson.

The calm atmosphere in a Montessori classroom illuminates from the adults in the room. Both the teacher and her assistant walk slowly, talk quietly, and model the calm focus that they expect. The role of the teacher is so different, that we don’t call them “teachers”, but “directresses”, because they direct the children toward their own exploration of learning, rather than sharing their own learning.
THE HIDDEN CURRICULUM
MULTIPLE YEARS
THE OUTCOME